Why Plant a Church with Converge?

I was talking with my new friend Chris about church planting at my office this afternoon. And by “office”, I mean the Starbucks I work out of Monday through Friday. I love my Starbucks! (In fact, someone even wrote an article about it and called me “The Starbucks Pastor”!) So there I was at Starbucks, talking with Chris, who is starting a new church in New Brighton, MN.

As I listened to him talk about his church planting journey I couldn’t help but compare his journey to mine. His denomination has not been able to be much of a support to him. After talking for a while, he asked me what I would do if I was in his shoes. First thing I said? “If I were you…I would join Converge and be one of our planters!”

Why would I say that? Why would I tell him to leave his fine denomination and join our small but mighty tribe?

Being a part of Converge North Central has made all the difference in the world in our church planting journey! I love my “tribe” so much! I don’t think I ever felt like I truly belonged until I became a part of the Minnesota/Iowa Baptist Conference (now known as Converge North Central).

So what makes Converge so great?

1. I feel like I BELONG 

The Converge pastors I’ve come to know in our district are super down-to-earth, normal dudes. I love that. They cheer each other on in such an encouraging way. The other church planters in our network are guys I actually like to hang out with. It is a great group to be a part of!

2. Amazing COACHING

I get to be coached by one of the greatest church planting coaches in the world! Dave Reno planted his church 27 years ago. Since then, his church has directly planted 26 daughter churches and his daughter churches have given birth to 8 granddaughter churches. That is truly phenomenal! There are 8x as many people attending a Sunday morning service at one of their daughter or granddaughter churches than attend his church. That shows the incredible power of multiplication!  And I get to be coached by Dave- the “Yoda of Church Planting”!

3. Humble and Supportive LEADERSHIP

I have gone through some really tough ministry experiences. I have made some mistakes and have also endured some really hurtful church experiences. I was ready to give up on the dream of church planting. But then I met Dave Reno and Ben McEachern (my other coach) and the Converge North Central leadership. They have supported me, believed in me, and took a risk on me. I will forever be grateful to Dan Carlson, Joel Nelson, and Mandy Johnson at the district office and Dave and Ben. Not only have they supported and believed in me, they are some of the  most humble and gracious leaders I have ever met.

There are many reasons to plant a church with Converge, but those are the top three that I came up with today. Two and a half years ago I was fertilizing lawns in Madison, WI, and didn’t know if I would ever get the chance to pastor a church. Today, thanks to Converge, I am leading a 15 month old church of 215 people that has baptized 25 people and seen dozens come to salvation in Jesus for the first time. God is so good and he has used Converge to help me in my church planting journey and to fulfill the purpose that God put me here to accomplish.

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Book Review: 7 Lessons for New Pastors

Before we can make any plans for the church, we must know the sheep well.  Take every opportunity to become familiar with members of your church. Don’t rush into your action plans too quickly. – from the book 7 Lessons for New Pastors, page 96

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Matthew D. Kim wrote this helpful book after his first year as a senior pastor.  Since I believe that God might be leading me to be a senior pastor, I thought it would be a good idea to do some reading on others’ experiences as new senior pastors.

Dr. Kim offers 7 good tips for new senior pastors.  The first couple chapters are about making sure you are called to be a pastor and the importance of finding the right church.  Then he moves into how to acclimate to the pastor’s life and gives some good tips on creating good habits.  Dr. Kim shares that the most important habit for a pastor is a strong prayer life.  He says: Prayer is priceless in the life of a pastor. It is the glue that holds everything together…Without prayer, we lack God’s love and power. Without prayer, we will be empty on the inside and have nothing left to give our parishioners. Without prayer, we cease to be pastors (page 53).

Chapter five is about how to develop your leadership skills.  He gives some good ideas on how to create and cast vision and the importance of developing leaders.  He shares that to be effective, learn to develop leaders and delegate responsibility…the church should be able to thrive without us.  That is the proper test of whether we have produced quality lay leaders (page 83).

In chapter six, Dr. Kim shares some great tips on how to love your congregation. He says: ministry is people. It is people that make the calling of ministry valuable and worthwhile (page 93). It is so easy to lose sight of that.  To get caught up in doing stuff and to forget that its all about people.  Dr. Kim shares some great ideas on how to get to know your congregation and to really get to know their stories.

And finally, in chapter 7, Dr. Kim shares his advice on how to be ready for when the unexpected happens.  What to do when tragedy strikes.  What to do when you get unusual and unexpected requests. And how to resist unexpected temptations.

All in all, I thought this was a great book that would be beneficial for anyone who is moving into a senior pastor role.  Check it out.

Book Review: Making Room for Leadership

have been called a bull in a china shop…on more than one occasion!  A friend, hoping to help, handed me this book to read…about four years ago.  To be honest, at that time I wasn’t ready to openly evaluate myself and how I used my physical presence to influence others.  I was defensive and thought, “well, this is just who I am!”

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Well, I finally got over myself and decided to read it.  In her book Making Room For Leadership: Power, Space, and Influence, MaryKate Morse asserts that we all take up space in a room (not just physically) and the way we use or don’t use our bodies in group settings influences others. She shares that most of us are unaware of the ways we use our bodies to influence others.  I would wholeheartedly agree with these ideas!

As I read this book, I reflected on my past.  I worked with someone who would use his body and physical presence to dominate the room and to force everyone else into submission. He referred to this as “powering up”.  It was incredibly intimidating and created a very tough working environment.  It wasn’t until I was out of the situation that I realized how emotionally damaging the working relationship was to me.

I do not want to lead like that.  MaryKate Morse talks about “shadows” and “sponges” in her book. I have come to the realization that on the scale of being a “shadow” with no presence or a “sponge” who soaks up all the physical space in a room, I am much more like a sponge.  I am who God created me to be BUT I can learn to me more like Jesus who used his power and influence to empower the marginalized and to stand up to those who are abusing their personal power.  I can learn to temper my big presence to help create safe environments that help others find their voice and to feel free to participate in this great endeavor of spreading the good news of the coming of God’s Kingdom.

This is a great book that would be very helpful for both “shadows” and “sponges”.  If you are someone who people ignore and you don’t feel like you have a voice, grab this book and learn how to appropriately gain influence and to partner with what God is doing.  If you are more like me, and tend to soak up all the space in a room, read this book and learn how to be more aware of your surroundings and how to help others feel safe and to share your influence and power.  God has a plan for ALL of us and he wants us ALL to participate in his great redemption story!

EL

Book Review- The Contemplative Pastor

The pastor’s question is, “Who are these particular people, and how can I be with them in such a way that they can become what God is making them?”- Eugene Peterson

I’m currently in a “wait and see” season of life.  I’ve described it to a friend as feeling like a shepherd with no flock.  Our time at our previous church came to an end in September 2013 and now we are waiting to see where God leads us next.

While I’ve been waiting, I have done a lot of praying and soul searching.  I have immersed my soul in God’s Word and listened to dozens of wonderful sermons from pastors Mark Driscoll (Seattle) and Tim Keller (New York City).

514PsIOYCmLI have also been reading a lot.  One of the books I just finished is titled The Contemplative Pastor: Returning to the Art of Spiritual Direction by Eugene Peterson.  Peterson, best known for his translation of the Bible called the Message, has also written numerous books on pastoring/shepherding.

The Contemplative Pastor is a really great book that I would recommend for anyone in ministry- but especially for a pastor who has already put in his first decade of service and is looking for wisdom from a pastor who had shepherded his people for decades.

Peterson encourages pastors to embrace “the unhurried life”- to leave room for God to move and to do life with messy people.  He says it this way:

How can I lead people into the quiet place beside the still waters if I am in perpetual motion? How can I persuade a person to live by faith and not by works if I have to juggle my schedule constantly to make everything fit into place?…I know I can’t be busy and pray at the same time. I can be active and pray; I can work and pray; but I cannot be busy and pray. I cannot be inwardly rushed, distracted, or dispersed.

That is such a good word.  Too often, we rush around trying to accomplish great things for God instead of just “be” and live in communion with God’s spirit.

Peterson also encourages pastors to really love their people and to take time for them.

Pastoral listening requires unhurried leisure, even if it’s only for five minutes.  Leisure is a quality of spirit, not a quantity of time.  Only in that ambiance of leisure do persons know they are listened to with absolute seriousness, treated with dignity and importance.  Speaking to people does not have the same personal intensity as listening to them. The question I put to myself is not “How many people have you spoken to about Christ this week?” but “How many people have you listened to in Christ this week?”

Wow.  Convicting.

If you are in ministry or if you feel like God has given you the spiritual gift of shepherding, I would strongly encourage you to pick up this book.  It will stretch and challenge you and help you on your journey to becoming more like our Great Shepherd- Jesus.

 

EL

Reflections on the Psalms: Psalm 23 Part 3

These past two weeks I’ve shared some thoughts on Psalm 23.  Today, I want to look at the final section of this great song of David.

psalm-23Thou preparest a table before me in the presence of mine enemies: thou anointest my head with oil; my cup runneth over.
Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me all the days of my life: and I will dwell in the house of the Lord for ever. –Psalm 23:5-6 (KJV)

There’s something very poetic about the way the King James Version translates the Psalms.  However, I also really enjoy the way the Message (Eugene Peterson) translates these great thoughts:

Your beauty and love chase after me
 every day of my life.
 I’m back home in the house of God
 for the rest of my life. -Psalm 23:6 (Message)

In section one of this psalm, we saw that the LORD is our Shepherd.  In section two, we saw that the LORD is our Guide.  In this final section, David wants us to see that the LORD is also our Good Host.

The LORD is the host at a banquet prepared for his child.  Before entering the banquet hall, the host would anoint the honored guest with oil  (Luke 7:46) made by adding perfumes to olive oil.

God is pictured as caring for my needs in the midst of the evil forces that attempt to destroy my life and my soul.

What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us?…No, in all these things we are more than conquerors through him who loved us. For I am sure that neither death nor life, nor angels nor rulers, nor things present nor things to come, nor powers, nor height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God in Christ Jesus our Lord. -Romans 8:31, 37-39 (ESV)

The good news is that there is room for all of us at God’s table.  And he freely shares with all.  I may eat at the LORD’s table in faith, fully at peace and protected by the shed blood and broken body of the Good Shepherd Jesus.

The talk of a feast anticipates a victory celebration, where the enemies are present as captives; or an accession feast with defeated rivals as reluctant guests.

But the prospect is better than just a feast!  In the Old Testament world, to eat and drink at someone’s table created a bond of mutual loyalty and could be the culminating token of a covenant (Exodus 24:8-12 and 1 Cor. 11:25).

Jesus invites us into that covenant relationship with him.  Not on the basis of what we have done, but because of what he has done for us.  Jesus laid down his life so that we could enter into covenant with God.  Despite all our failures and despite everything we face in this world, we are invited to join Jesus at his Father’s table.

Here’s the good news for us: 

Its about being more than just God’s acquaintance, invited to come for the day.  It is to LIVE with Him.  It is the end of a long pilgrimage.  A coming home.